The Stone Tablet

Creative Ways to Start Creative Writing

A+notebook+of+a+student+here+at+Stone+filled+with+their+personal+stories.+Many+students+carry+notebooks+like+this+around+in+case+an+idea+comes+to+them.
A notebook of a student here at Stone filled with their personal stories. Many students carry notebooks like this around in case an idea comes to them.

A notebook of a student here at Stone filled with their personal stories. Many students carry notebooks like this around in case an idea comes to them.

A notebook of a student here at Stone filled with their personal stories. Many students carry notebooks like this around in case an idea comes to them.

Emmaleigh B., Staff Writer

Writing a story can be fun, relaxing, and good for your mental health, and although it seems hard even the most simple story has the potential to be published. Here are some easy ways to start a story that could be considered a masterpiece.

1. Word Cluster

This exercise is from The Writing Center and consists of two steps. First, you choose a random word, any word you want, and write it at the top of your page. Then below it, you list everything that you think of when you read that word; you shouldn’t put any filter on what you write. When you’re done, you should have about half a page of thoughts and words that you came up with.

2. Rewriting the Past

A simple exercise thought up by Global Digital Citizen has you tearing apart your house looking for old postcards and photographs. Once you find one, you should study it and try to figure out what’s going on, or just make it up. If it’s a photo, write about what was happening, if its a postcard or another old item, write about why you think it was written or used. If you don’t have anything in your home, Google is a wonderful resource for all kinds of historical information.

3. Brain Dump

This one is probably the easiest, it consists of simply jotting random thoughts onto a piece of paper. You could take a walk, or sit on a park bench, or at a store or anywhere, look around and jot down things you see. It can be anything, for example, a tree branch, a couple walking, or a bird pecking at the dirt, just jot it down and maybe you can write something about it later.

4. Writers Camps and Workshops

There are many writers workshops and camps for kids, teens, and adults. They can be held at schools, libraries, and many other places. Often, they are led by retired teachers, authors, and other experts.While, some of these events cost money, others are for free and either way they are very good resources to get advice and support from both teachers and peers on your work in order to improve.

5. Simple Explanation

This is another exercise from Global Digital Citizen, and all you need to do to start is think of a task, any task will do for this exercise, but you may want to pick something simple. When you have chosen a task your goal is to explain it in a hundred words or less. You should focus on explaining your task as clearly as possible so that a reader could complete the task, even if they have never done it before. The purpose of the exercise is to practice getting a point across to the reader in as few words as possible. This is helpful for when you need to express an important detail in the story, but you don’t want to draw it out too much.

6. Alphabet

An exercise presented by the Huffington Post, the alphabet exercise is very fun to do. Your story should end up being 26 sentences long, with the first word of each sentence starting with its corresponding letter, for instance, the first word of my first sentence would start with the letter A, the first word of the second sentence would start with the letter B, and so on. This exercise can be useful in training you to use synonyms in order to make sentences more interesting.

7. Create a Character

Character is often the most important part of fiction writing, having dynamic and relatable characters can draw your readers in, even if your technical writing skills aren’t the best. When creating a character, there are many places to start; some examples include gender, names, physical features, or character traits. This exercise requires you to create a character and base your story off of them. You should never feel afraid to use random name generators or other online resources to help you get ideas.

8. Setting Practice

For this exercise, Google is your best friend. You should start by coming up with the type of setting you want to write about; it could be a forest,] an old house, a church, or anything else you can think of for your story. Once you have your idea, you can either search it up on Google Images or use a picture of your own. Once you have your picture, write away, describe the picture in as much detail as possible and even add a character or two if you feel like they fit. Just have fun with it!

9. Five Senses

This exercise tests all of your senses and your ability to process them. You can be anywhere when doing this exercise, but it’s best to pick a new place each time. Just be quiet and pay attention to your surroundings, write about what you see, hear, feel, touch, and taste. When you have finished writing the reader should be able to feel as if they were sitting right next to you experiencing the same sensations.

10. Writing In The Dark

Although you don’t need to have the lights off for this exercise it could definitely set the mood. All you need is some paper, a pen, and your deepest darkest thoughts, sit alone in a room and just write. Don’t worry about what comes out, don’t worry about what others will think, just write until you can’t write anymore. When you’re done you should feel relaxed and maybe something will have sparked inspiration, but the most important thing to know is that you should feel free to destroy that piece of paper and never show anyone, because when you write you’re expressing your thoughts, feelings, and fears, and you don’t have to show anyone else unless you want to.

 

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